Ghostwriting

I I fell into ghostwriting by a happy accident. The year was 2010, the beginning of my Hero’s Journey, Alice in Wonderland-like adventure trying to figure out “what’s next” in my career.

After building a 20-year journalism career, things started shifting: magazine assignments got smaller, the writing was going in-house more, payments started becoming unreliable, and some magazines folded altogether.

Any good journalist knows that three things make a trend, and it didn’t take a fact-checker to forecast that something was amiss. As the national print magazine industry began a slow decline, I realized that my dream job I’d worked toward and created for 20 years simply wasn’t sustainable anymore.

After a period of navel-gazing, growing panic and a smallish identity crisis, I decided to see if public relations might be my jam. After all, it was journalism-adjacent given that I’d worked closely with PR professionals for years. I was excited to give it a whirl.

I joined a Portland PR agency, where I was put on their law firm account as their de facto copywriter. I’d interview lawyers about their expertise and personality and pen blog posts and articles for them. It became a favorite part of my agency job, and while I decided in the end that PR wasn’t for me, that experience helped me launch a ghostwriting career.

What I love about ghostwriting is that, just like in my journalism stories, I truly enjoy speaking with subject matter experts to find their story, bring it to life, and tell it in their voice. Sometimes the best details, the most juicy “aha” moments, come from simply having a conversation about your idea first. From there, I can write an outline and start to shape it for you, and we—or you—can take it from there.

I’ve ghostwritten book proposals and chapters for numerous fitness and sports professionals, and I’ve penned executive speeches, op-eds, blog posts, video scripts, and articles for banking and tech executives.

Megan McMorris freelance ghostwriter
There are times when things just seem to write themselves. This picture was taken at the Mineral School (mineral-school.org), and shows my desk for a week as I worked on my forthcoming novel. Between the view, the vibe, and the huge school chalkboard, I was in a flow. I like to think the secret ingredient was a friendly ghostie or two whispering the words into my ear. (Hey, even a ghostwriter needs a little help now and again, even if it’s an ethereal source!)

I I fell into ghostwriting by a happy accident. The year was 2010, the beginning of my Hero’s Journey, Alice in Wonderland-like adventure trying to figure out “what’s next” in my career.

After building a 20-year journalism career, things started shifting: magazine assignments got smaller, the writing was going in-house more, payments started becoming unreliable, and some magazines folded altogether.

Any good journalist knows that three things make a trend, and it didn’t take a fact-checker to forecast that something was amiss. As the national print magazine industry began a slow decline, I realized that my dream job I’d worked toward and created for 20 years simply wasn’t sustainable anymore.

After a period of navel-gazing, growing panic and a smallish identity crisis, I decided to see if public relations might be my jam. After all, it was journalism-adjacent given that I’d worked closely with PR professionals for years. I was excited to give it a whirl.

I joined a Portland PR agency, where I was put on their law firm account as their de facto copywriter. I’d interview lawyers about their expertise and personality and pen blog posts and articles for them. It became a favorite part of my agency job, and while I decided in the end that PR wasn’t for me, that experience helped me launch a ghostwriting career.

What I love about ghostwriting is that, just like in my journalism stories, I truly enjoy speaking with subject matter experts to find their story, bring it to life, and tell it in their voice. Sometimes the best details, the most juicy “aha” moments, come from simply having a conversation about your idea first. From there, I can write an outline and start to shape it for you, and we—or you—can take it from there.

I’ve ghostwritten book proposals and chapters for numerous fitness and sports professionals, and I’ve penned executive speeches, op-eds, blog posts, video scripts, and articles for banking and tech executives.

Megan McMorris freelance ghostwriter
There are times when things just seem to write themselves. This picture was taken at the Mineral School (mineral-school.org), and shows my desk for a week as I worked on my forthcoming novel. Between the view, the vibe, and the huge school chalkboard, I was in a flow. I like to think the secret ingredient was a friendly ghostie or two whispering the words into my ear. (Hey, even a ghostwriter needs a little help now and again, even if it’s an ethereal source!)

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